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Card making to help build relationships. Key Stage 1

lets be friends 1

Overview

Card-making to help build relationships and promote class cohesion in the early years. Choice of text frame and timing of delivery are flexible. The plan that follows is written as an induction/ ‘getting to know you’ activity in which children make and send a simple card to a classmate containing a positive message.

 

Learning objectives: by the end of the lesson

  • All children will have met and introduced a classmate, and made a new friend.
  • (Optional) All children will have shared information about their favourite things e.g. food/ sport / hobbies/ toys.
  • All children will have practiced colouring, drawing, cutting, sticking and folding skills.
  • All children will have matched/ copied/ traced or written their own name and the name of a friend.
  • Some children will be able to recognize and read, when prompted, ‘I’, ‘like’ and ‘you’.
  • Some children will be able to predict and recognize ‘Dear’ and ‘From’
  • Some children will have traced/ copied/ written a simple message to their new friend.
  • All children will have stamped and addressed an envelope for internal posting.
  • All children will be able to distinguish between 1st and 2nd class stamps by colour and number.
  • Most will understand difference in price (cheaper, more expensive) and link to speed of delivery.
  • All children will be able to name Queen Elizabeth II.
  • All children will have had an opportunity to express their feelings about giving and receiving.
  • (Optional extension activity) Most children will be able to identify a 50p, 10p, 2p and 1p coin by number and shape; some will be able to add 50p +10p +2p to purchase a 1st class stamp costing 62p.

 


Downloads

Lets’ be friends – Word document – Download | 650.9 KB

 

If your computer cannot read Word documents then please download the 3 PDF’s below

Lets’ be friends – PDF 1 - Download | 391.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 2 - Download | 33.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 3 - Download | 280.9 KB

 

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The Last Post

The Last Post PDF

Overview

Last Post: The Postal Service in the First World War, a free learning resource for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 from the British Postal Museum & Archive, sponsored by Royal Mail

 

Last Post: The Postal Service in the First World War reveals the fascinating human stories of the General Post Office (GPO) at War.

 

Did you know?

  • In the First World War letters took just two days to reach the Front Line
  • 12.5 million letters were sent to the Front Lines every week
  • 12,000 soldiers served in the General Post Office’s own regiment, the Post Office Rifles
  • 33,000 women stepped into postal jobs traditionally held by men

 

GPO in the First World War

During the First World War the GPO released more than 75,000 employees to fight, including 12,000 men who fought in its own regiment, the Post Office Rifles. In their absence the GPO became one of the largest employers of women when over 33,000 women stepped in to fill these positions.

The Post Office Rifles fought in many of the First World War’s major battles after arriving in France in March 1915. For their services members were awarded 145 decorations for gallantry, including one Victoria Cross and 27 battle honours. Four postal workers won the Victoria Cross during the course of the war but Sgt Alfred Knight, whose story of selflessness and bravery is explored in the learning resource, was the only Post Office Rifle.

 

During the conflict, the GPO controlled Britain’s domestic postal, telegraph and telephone services. Writing and receiving letters and parcels were a vital part of sustaining morale and overcoming the boredom of trench life. This meant that letters were written to and from the Front Line with great frequency. When war broke out, a purpose built sorting office was created in London’s Regent’s Park called the Home Depot to handle this increase in the volume of mail. At the height of the war it handled over 12.5 million letters a week. Every letter sent from Britain to the fighting fronts was sorted and censored here by over 2,500 workers, many of them women, and on average it only took two days for a letter from Britain to reach the Western Front.

 

The Learning Resource

In Last Post war time characters guide pupils through the different topics to tell these stories and many more. Using real archival documents, photographs, maps and museum objects they will discover how the postal service went to war. There are also over 100 fun and engaging cross-curricular activities to aid learning, including how to make a Morse code transmitter, how to send a secret message by pigeon post and how to search the Royal Mail war memorials database to learn about the impact of the war in your area.

 

The free resource includes:

  • lesson plans
  • teacher’s notes
  • PowerPoints for whiteboards
  • image galleries
  • over 100 activity ideas

 


Downloads

Download 154.9 MB

 

 

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Seaside – Issued September 2014

Seaside_Full Set Stamps

 

Seaside Mini sheet

 

ROYAL MAIL LAUNCHES SPECIAL STAMPS CELEBRATING UK’S PIERS AND SEASIDE ARCHITECTURE

  • The issue includes six Special Stamps celebrating the variety and originality of UK seaside architecture and a four-stamp Miniature Sheet featuring iconic piers from across the country
  • The stamp set features images of Eastbourne Bandstand, Tinside Lido (Plymouth), Bangor Pier, Southwold Lighthouse, Blackpool Pleasure Beach and a Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter
  • The Miniature Sheet stamps pay tribute to the piers of Llandudno, Dunoon, Brighton and Worthing. Southend Pier features as the background image on the sheet

 

The chosen selection captures distinctive types of seaside architecture from key periods with a range of resort type – large and small, well-known and less so.

The structures represent the key time periods of seaside development from the Victorian and Art Deco eras, to the Modernism of 1930s and up to present day, showing that contemporary design is still used to regenerate these resorts.

All of the chosen structures are fine examples of their type. They have all been newly photographed as vibrant, well-used places to celebrate the resurgence of interest in the British seaside which has happened over the last two decades. The contemporary shelter at Bexhill brings the story right up to date.

 

Stamps

Eastbourne Bandstand with its distinctive semi-circular design was opened in 1935 and still hosts well-attended concerts.

Tinside Lido, Plymouth, is a Grade II listed building and one of the best surviving 1930s Art Deco pools in the country.

Bangor Pier was built in the 1890s and was a landing stage for holiday-makers from Liverpool. The stamp shows one of the distinctive kiosks.

Southwold Lighthouse sits within the picturesque Suffolk town. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Trinity House, which operates lighthouses and aids to navigation in England and Wales.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach has countless attractions including the Casino building designed by Joseph Emberton and a nationally important modernist building which opened in 1939. Despite its name, it has never been used for gambling.

Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter is an eight-ton timber and steel cube on the West Parade, one of four modern shelters installed at the East Sussex resort.

 

Miniature Sheet

Llandudno Pier is the longest pier in Wales and unusual in that it has two entrances. It is a fine example of a classic Victorian pier.

Dunoon Pier in Scotland still sees ships dock and is an interesting timber-framed late Victorian example.

Brighton Pier is the last surviving of the resorts three piers, and its helter-skelter is one of the best examples of its type in the country.

Worthing Pier’s amusement pavilion was built in the 1930s on the Victorian structure, demonstrating how many piers evolved over the decades.

 

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The Great War – Issued July 2014

The Great War 1914 stamps set.indd

Royal Mail will issue a landmark series of Special Stamps each year from 2014 to 2018 to commemorate the Great War. The set will feature 30 stamps, with six being produced each year. The first set of stamps was issued in July this year. The public can register their interest in the stamps by visiting www.royalmail.com/firstworldwar

  • The stamp range will provide a wide-ranging and inclusive commemoration. Themes that will be covered during the five years include:
  • How artists, including writers and painters, interpreted the events
  • The role of non-combatants and civilians
  • The role of the Services
  • The role of women
  • The contribution of the Commonwealth
  • Alongside the stamps programme, Royal Mail has published a searchable database of the memorials in its care www.royalmailmemorials.com. Royal Mail is also custodian of around 250 war memorials commemorating those who gave their lives. More than 75,000 men from the General Post Office (GPO) fought in the Great War, including 12,000 men who fought with its own regiment, the Post Office Rifles

The stamp series has been designed to be as wide-ranging and inclusive as possible. It will feature a collection of subjects including the contribution of the armed services, the role of the Commonwealth Countries and non-combatants and women.

The stories of the War will be told through imagery including historic Memorials, artefacts that have become synonymous with the conflict, portraits of some of the participants, art showing some of the famous and moving scenes of the conflict, and newly-commissioned artworks of poppies – the symbol of Remembrance – from leading artists such as Fiona Strickland.

The 2014 set features the following:

Poppy- Original artwork by Fiona Strickland, the Scottish born and Edinburgh based leading botanical artist. She is a member of the Royal Society of Botanical Artists and considered among the leading contemporary botanical artists.

War Poetry– Lines from the poem, ‘For the Fallen’ by Lawrence Binyon. First published in The Times on 21 September 1914, ‘For the Fallen’ is the poet’s response to the first few weeks of the War. It is familiar through its recitation at Remembrance ceremonies in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Binyon volunteered for hospital work in France during the War. Royal Mail commissioned a letter-cutter to engrave a section of the poem into stone. This was then photographed and the image used on the stamp.

War Art- ‘A Star Shell’’ by CRW Nevinson. The image is of a flare that illuminated no man’s land. Nevinson is widely regarded as one of the most important artists of the Great War, with paintings in the collection of Tate Britain and Imperial War Museums. The artwork is on display at Tate Britain.

Portrait- Private William Tickle, who enlisted on 7 September 1914, and served in the 9th Battallion, Essex Regiment. He was accepted despite being under age (15 on enlisting). He served until he was killed at the Battle of the Somme in 1916. This is one of thousands of photographs donated to the Imperial War Museum shortly after the war’s end in response to pleas to send images of those who had died.

Memorial – ‘The Response’, a bronze memorial by Welsh artist Sir William Goscombe John, represents the raising of several companies of the Northumberland Fusiliers and depicts the men joining up in 1914. The memorial is located in a public park in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne.

Artefact– Princess Mary Gift Box. In October 1914, the Christmas Gift Fund was launched by Princess Mary, the 17-year-old daughter of King George V and Queen Mary. The purpose was to provide everyone wearing the King’s uniform and serving overseas on Christmas Day 1914 with a ‘gift from the nation’. The result was the production of an embossed brass box, which contained a Christmas card and a picture of the Princess along with gifts. Servicemen at the front or at sea who were smokers received a pipe, an ounce of tobacco, cigarettes and a tinder lighter. Non-smokers received a packet of sweets and a writing case with pencil, paper and envelopes.

Royal Mail is an official First World War Centenary Partner with the Imperial War Museum.

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Teacher’s Post – Issue 36

Teacher's Post Magazine Cover for Issue 36

In this issue

  • Amy the artist
  • Sarah’s second Tough Mudder
  • Sunset Before the Storm
  • Great British Films feature on Special Stamps
  • World Book Day at Murston Junior School
  • Topics in Tudor History
  • Museum on Track

 

Download this issue

Download link: Download

File size: 9.5 MB