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Hurrah for Ra

Hurrah for Ra

Hurrah for Ra 2

Overview

Art, design and history come together in this ‘Thank you’ card-making project dedicated to the Egyptian sun god, Ra. Children will learn about paper-making, the origins of writing and about Ancient Egyptian culture, expressed through the art and artefacts discovered in King Tutankhamun’s tomb.

 

Learning objectives: by the end of the lesson

  • All will have considered the value of saying thank you, particularly for the gifts of the natural world
  • Most will be able to locate Egypt on a map, identify the Sahara Desert and the River Nile.
  • All will be able to name the sun god, Ra, and explain his importance to the Ancient Egyptians.
  • All will have the opportunity to explore/identify artefacts excavated from King Tutankhamen’s tomb.
  • Some will be able to formulate an historical timeline of events
  • All will be able to describe the importance and the many uses if papyrus.
  • All will be able to link the plant to the invention and etymology of ‘paper’.
  • Most will be able to sequence and explain the stages in the Ancient Egyptian paper making process.
  • All will have approximated the process in their own paper-making craft activity.
  • All will have discussed the importance and multiple reasons for writing
  • All will have identified and reproduced examples of Egyptian hieroglyphics.
  • Most will be able to name key events in the history and development of writing.
  • All will have designed and produced a card using Ancient Egyptian drawing techniques.
  • Some will have explored Ancient Egyptian design motifs and techniques in greater depth.
  • Some will have made comparisons between 3D and 2D representation.
  • Some will have independently researched sun god mythology in greater detail and depth.
  • All should be given the opportunity to evaluate their own and other’s work.

 


Downloads

Hurrah for Ra – Word document – Download | 6.6 MB

Hurrah for Ra – Powerpoint document - Download | 6.6 MB

 

If your computer cannot read Word or Powerpoint documents then please download the 2 PDF’s below:

Hurrah for Ra – PDF 1 - Download | 3.4 MB

Hurrah for Ra – PDF 2 - Download | 3.6 MB

 

 

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Card making to help build relationships. Key Stage 1

lets be friends 1

Overview

Card-making to help build relationships and promote class cohesion in the early years. Choice of text frame and timing of delivery are flexible. The plan that follows is written as an induction/ ‘getting to know you’ activity in which children make and send a simple card to a classmate containing a positive message.

 

Learning objectives: by the end of the lesson

  • All children will have met and introduced a classmate, and made a new friend.
  • (Optional) All children will have shared information about their favourite things e.g. food/ sport / hobbies/ toys.
  • All children will have practiced colouring, drawing, cutting, sticking and folding skills.
  • All children will have matched/ copied/ traced or written their own name and the name of a friend.
  • Some children will be able to recognize and read, when prompted, ‘I’, ‘like’ and ‘you’.
  • Some children will be able to predict and recognize ‘Dear’ and ‘From’
  • Some children will have traced/ copied/ written a simple message to their new friend.
  • All children will have stamped and addressed an envelope for internal posting.
  • All children will be able to distinguish between 1st and 2nd class stamps by colour and number.
  • Most will understand difference in price (cheaper, more expensive) and link to speed of delivery.
  • All children will be able to name Queen Elizabeth II.
  • All children will have had an opportunity to express their feelings about giving and receiving.
  • (Optional extension activity) Most children will be able to identify a 50p, 10p, 2p and 1p coin by number and shape; some will be able to add 50p +10p +2p to purchase a 1st class stamp costing 62p.

 


Downloads

Lets’ be friends – Word document – Download | 650.9 KB

 

If your computer cannot read Word documents then please download the 3 PDF’s below

Lets’ be friends – PDF 1 - Download | 391.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 2 - Download | 33.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 3 - Download | 280.9 KB

 

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The Last Post

The Last Post PDF

Overview

Last Post: The Postal Service in the First World War, a free learning resource for Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 from the British Postal Museum & Archive, sponsored by Royal Mail

 

Last Post: The Postal Service in the First World War reveals the fascinating human stories of the General Post Office (GPO) at War.

 

Did you know?

  • In the First World War letters took just two days to reach the Front Line
  • 12.5 million letters were sent to the Front Lines every week
  • 12,000 soldiers served in the General Post Office’s own regiment, the Post Office Rifles
  • 33,000 women stepped into postal jobs traditionally held by men

 

GPO in the First World War

During the First World War the GPO released more than 75,000 employees to fight, including 12,000 men who fought in its own regiment, the Post Office Rifles. In their absence the GPO became one of the largest employers of women when over 33,000 women stepped in to fill these positions.

The Post Office Rifles fought in many of the First World War’s major battles after arriving in France in March 1915. For their services members were awarded 145 decorations for gallantry, including one Victoria Cross and 27 battle honours. Four postal workers won the Victoria Cross during the course of the war but Sgt Alfred Knight, whose story of selflessness and bravery is explored in the learning resource, was the only Post Office Rifle.

 

During the conflict, the GPO controlled Britain’s domestic postal, telegraph and telephone services. Writing and receiving letters and parcels were a vital part of sustaining morale and overcoming the boredom of trench life. This meant that letters were written to and from the Front Line with great frequency. When war broke out, a purpose built sorting office was created in London’s Regent’s Park called the Home Depot to handle this increase in the volume of mail. At the height of the war it handled over 12.5 million letters a week. Every letter sent from Britain to the fighting fronts was sorted and censored here by over 2,500 workers, many of them women, and on average it only took two days for a letter from Britain to reach the Western Front.

 

The Learning Resource

In Last Post war time characters guide pupils through the different topics to tell these stories and many more. Using real archival documents, photographs, maps and museum objects they will discover how the postal service went to war. There are also over 100 fun and engaging cross-curricular activities to aid learning, including how to make a Morse code transmitter, how to send a secret message by pigeon post and how to search the Royal Mail war memorials database to learn about the impact of the war in your area.

 

The free resource includes:

  • lesson plans
  • teacher’s notes
  • PowerPoints for whiteboards
  • image galleries
  • over 100 activity ideas

 


Downloads

Download 154.9 MB

 

 

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Seaside – Issued September 2014

Seaside_Full Set Stamps

 

Seaside Mini sheet

 

ROYAL MAIL LAUNCHES SPECIAL STAMPS CELEBRATING UK’S PIERS AND SEASIDE ARCHITECTURE

  • The issue includes six Special Stamps celebrating the variety and originality of UK seaside architecture and a four-stamp Miniature Sheet featuring iconic piers from across the country
  • The stamp set features images of Eastbourne Bandstand, Tinside Lido (Plymouth), Bangor Pier, Southwold Lighthouse, Blackpool Pleasure Beach and a Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter
  • The Miniature Sheet stamps pay tribute to the piers of Llandudno, Dunoon, Brighton and Worthing. Southend Pier features as the background image on the sheet

 

The chosen selection captures distinctive types of seaside architecture from key periods with a range of resort type – large and small, well-known and less so.

The structures represent the key time periods of seaside development from the Victorian and Art Deco eras, to the Modernism of 1930s and up to present day, showing that contemporary design is still used to regenerate these resorts.

All of the chosen structures are fine examples of their type. They have all been newly photographed as vibrant, well-used places to celebrate the resurgence of interest in the British seaside which has happened over the last two decades. The contemporary shelter at Bexhill brings the story right up to date.

 

Stamps

Eastbourne Bandstand with its distinctive semi-circular design was opened in 1935 and still hosts well-attended concerts.

Tinside Lido, Plymouth, is a Grade II listed building and one of the best surviving 1930s Art Deco pools in the country.

Bangor Pier was built in the 1890s and was a landing stage for holiday-makers from Liverpool. The stamp shows one of the distinctive kiosks.

Southwold Lighthouse sits within the picturesque Suffolk town. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Trinity House, which operates lighthouses and aids to navigation in England and Wales.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach has countless attractions including the Casino building designed by Joseph Emberton and a nationally important modernist building which opened in 1939. Despite its name, it has never been used for gambling.

Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter is an eight-ton timber and steel cube on the West Parade, one of four modern shelters installed at the East Sussex resort.

 

Miniature Sheet

Llandudno Pier is the longest pier in Wales and unusual in that it has two entrances. It is a fine example of a classic Victorian pier.

Dunoon Pier in Scotland still sees ships dock and is an interesting timber-framed late Victorian example.

Brighton Pier is the last surviving of the resorts three piers, and its helter-skelter is one of the best examples of its type in the country.

Worthing Pier’s amusement pavilion was built in the 1930s on the Victorian structure, demonstrating how many piers evolved over the decades.