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Magna Carta Philatelic – Issued June 2015

18040447.548d57e585fcd

2015_MCarta_Set

Reason and inspiration

This year marks the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta, the foundation stone of the Rule of Law whose influence has extended around the world. To commemorate this milestone Royal Mail has worked closely with the Magna Carta 800th Committee to produce six Special Stamps depicting the Magna Carta itself as well as major international bills and declarations inspired by it that have been issued to protect civil liberties and rights.

Meaning ‘The Great Charter’, it was reluctantly granted by the tyrannical King John of England in Runnymede on 15th June 1215 as a practical solution to the political crisis he faced. Written in Latin on a single parchment and comprising a total of 63 clauses, Magna Carta established for the first time that the king was subject to the law rather than above it. It was effectively a peace treaty between the king and a group of barons.

Once King John was forced to acknowledge a schedule of rights and of limitations on royal action, consideration was given to ways of ensuring he abided by the charter’s ruling. To this end, clause 61 known as the security clause (forma securitatis) was included which allowed the selection by the barons of twenty-five barons of the realm to “observe, maintain and cause to be observed the peace and liberties which we have granted”.

Although nearly a third of the text was dropped or substantially rewritten within ten years and almost all the clauses have been repealed in modern times, the Magna Carta remains a cornerstone of the British Constitution and its principles are echoed in the US constitution and others around the world. The many divergent uses that have been made of it since the Middle Ages have shaped its meaning in the modern era, and it has become a potent, international rallying cry against the arbitrary use of power. Indeed, in any debate on the issue of liberty the Magna Carta is regularly cited.

Clauses 39 and 40 remain to this day on the statutory books, establishing that no man will be imprisoned or have his land taken away unless by the law of the land and judged by his peers. But there were other clauses incorporated in the Magna Carta at the insistence of certain barons to protect their own interests including clause 60 which restricts the right to fish in the Thames and a reference to silting in the Medway; it also refers to the removal of alien Knights and foreigners.

 

Stamp details

Magna Carta – First Class

Sealed at Runnymede on 15th June 1215 most of the clauses in the Magna Carta were drawn up to address specific grievances concerning the rule of King John.

 

Simon De Montfort’s Parliament – First Class

Set up in January 1265 this was the first Parliament to which the burgesses who were the representatives of the towns were summoned. De Montfort was a French political adventurer who came to England in 1253 and was the leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III.

 

Bill of Rights – £1.33

The Bill of Rights was passed in 1689 and made parliament a branch of government superior to the monarch. Several articles from it remain relevant today particularly those relating to ‘freedom of election’ and ‘freedom of speech’.

 

American Bill of Rights £1.33

This is a collective name afforded to the first ten amendments to the American constitution. They guaranteed freedom of religion and speech, the liberty of the press, the right to petition and bear arms, and immunity against arbitrary search and arrest as well as excessive punishment.

 

Universal Declaration of Human Rights – £1.52

This was adopted by the United Nations in 1948 in response to the horrors of war and constitutes the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are entitled. The first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights, which was charged with drafting the Declaration, was Eleanor Roosevelt.

 

Charter of the Commonwealth – £1.52

Adopted in December 2012 and officially signed by Her Majesty the Queen in March the following Year, the Charter of the Commonwealth comprises 16 care beliefs and brings together the values and aspirations that united the Commonwealth, namely democracy, human rights and the rule of law.

 

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Card making to help build relationships. Key Stage 1

lets be friends 1

Overview

Card-making to help build relationships and promote class cohesion in the early years. Choice of text frame and timing of delivery are flexible. The plan that follows is written as an induction/ ‘getting to know you’ activity in which children make and send a simple card to a classmate containing a positive message.

 

Learning objectives: by the end of the lesson

  • All children will have met and introduced a classmate, and made a new friend.
  • (Optional) All children will have shared information about their favourite things e.g. food/ sport / hobbies/ toys.
  • All children will have practiced colouring, drawing, cutting, sticking and folding skills.
  • All children will have matched/ copied/ traced or written their own name and the name of a friend.
  • Some children will be able to recognize and read, when prompted, ‘I’, ‘like’ and ‘you’.
  • Some children will be able to predict and recognize ‘Dear’ and ‘From’
  • Some children will have traced/ copied/ written a simple message to their new friend.
  • All children will have stamped and addressed an envelope for internal posting.
  • All children will be able to distinguish between 1st and 2nd class stamps by colour and number.
  • Most will understand difference in price (cheaper, more expensive) and link to speed of delivery.
  • All children will be able to name Queen Elizabeth II.
  • All children will have had an opportunity to express their feelings about giving and receiving.
  • (Optional extension activity) Most children will be able to identify a 50p, 10p, 2p and 1p coin by number and shape; some will be able to add 50p +10p +2p to purchase a 1st class stamp costing 62p.

 


Downloads

Lets’ be friends – Word document – Download | 650.9 KB

 

If your computer cannot read Word documents then please download the 3 PDF’s below

Lets’ be friends – PDF 1 - Download | 391.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 2 - Download | 33.8 KB

Lets’ be friends - PDF 3 - Download | 280.9 KB

 

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Seaside – Issued September 2014

Seaside_Full Set Stamps

 

Seaside Mini sheet

 

ROYAL MAIL LAUNCHES SPECIAL STAMPS CELEBRATING UK’S PIERS AND SEASIDE ARCHITECTURE

  • The issue includes six Special Stamps celebrating the variety and originality of UK seaside architecture and a four-stamp Miniature Sheet featuring iconic piers from across the country
  • The stamp set features images of Eastbourne Bandstand, Tinside Lido (Plymouth), Bangor Pier, Southwold Lighthouse, Blackpool Pleasure Beach and a Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter
  • The Miniature Sheet stamps pay tribute to the piers of Llandudno, Dunoon, Brighton and Worthing. Southend Pier features as the background image on the sheet

 

The chosen selection captures distinctive types of seaside architecture from key periods with a range of resort type – large and small, well-known and less so.

The structures represent the key time periods of seaside development from the Victorian and Art Deco eras, to the Modernism of 1930s and up to present day, showing that contemporary design is still used to regenerate these resorts.

All of the chosen structures are fine examples of their type. They have all been newly photographed as vibrant, well-used places to celebrate the resurgence of interest in the British seaside which has happened over the last two decades. The contemporary shelter at Bexhill brings the story right up to date.

 

Stamps

Eastbourne Bandstand with its distinctive semi-circular design was opened in 1935 and still hosts well-attended concerts.

Tinside Lido, Plymouth, is a Grade II listed building and one of the best surviving 1930s Art Deco pools in the country.

Bangor Pier was built in the 1890s and was a landing stage for holiday-makers from Liverpool. The stamp shows one of the distinctive kiosks.

Southwold Lighthouse sits within the picturesque Suffolk town. This year marks the 500th anniversary of Trinity House, which operates lighthouses and aids to navigation in England and Wales.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach has countless attractions including the Casino building designed by Joseph Emberton and a nationally important modernist building which opened in 1939. Despite its name, it has never been used for gambling.

Bexhill-on-Sea Shelter is an eight-ton timber and steel cube on the West Parade, one of four modern shelters installed at the East Sussex resort.

 

Miniature Sheet

Llandudno Pier is the longest pier in Wales and unusual in that it has two entrances. It is a fine example of a classic Victorian pier.

Dunoon Pier in Scotland still sees ships dock and is an interesting timber-framed late Victorian example.

Brighton Pier is the last surviving of the resorts three piers, and its helter-skelter is one of the best examples of its type in the country.

Worthing Pier’s amusement pavilion was built in the 1930s on the Victorian structure, demonstrating how many piers evolved over the decades.